12 days in Iceland, Ireland & Scotland Itinerary

12 days in Iceland, Ireland & Scotland Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Europe travel route planner

Plan created by another user. Make it yours
Fly
1
Reykjavik, Iceland
— 1 night
Fly
2
Kilkenny, Ireland
— 2 nights
Drive
3
Dublin, Ireland
— 2 nights
Fly
4
Edinburgh, United Kingdom
— 2 nights
Drive
5
Glasgow, United Kingdom
— 2 nights
Fly to New York JFK, Train to Baltimore

S M T W T F S
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1
night
Reykjavik, Iceland

Reykjavik, the world's most northerly capital, effortlessly combines small-town charm with heaps of big city energy.
Start off your visit on the 14th (Sat): test the waters at a local thermal spa, trot along with a tour on horseback, and then pause for some serene contemplation at Hallgrimskirkja.

To see more things to do, traveler tips, ratings, and tourist information, refer to the Reykjavik trip itinerary builder website.

Baltimore, USA to Reykjavik is an approximately 12.5-hour flight. You can also fly. The time zone difference when traveling from Baltimore to Reykjavik is 5 hours. Traveling from Baltimore in March, expect Reykjavik to be slightly colder, temps between 39°F and 30°F. You'll set off for Kilkenny on the 15th (Sun).

Things to do in Reykjavik

Wildlife · Outdoors · Tours · Spas

Side Trips

Find places to stay Mar 14 — 15:

2
nights
Kilkenny, Ireland

Marble City

The country's smallest city in terms of population, Kilkenny boasts a rich cultural heritage and diverse tourist attractions that include well-preserved medieval architecture, exciting nightlife, a vibrant culinary scene, and abundant shopping opportunities.
Kick off your visit on the 16th (Mon): explore the historical opulence of Kilkenny Castle, steep yourself in history at Jerpoint Park, contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Jerpoint Abbey, brush up on your knowledge of spirits at Ballykeefe Distillery, then take in the spiritual surroundings of St. Canice's Cathedral & Round Tower, and finally stop by Kilkenny Architectural Salvage & Antiques. Keep things going the next day: head outdoors with Go With The Flow - River Adventures, explore the galleries of Rothe House and Garden, then sample the tasty concoctions at Brewery Corner, and finally take in the spiritual surroundings of St. John the Evangelist Church.

For photos, other places to visit, more things to do, and other tourist information, read Kilkenny vacation planner.

Fly from Reykjavik to Kilkenny in 8.5 hours. Plan for somewhat warmer temperatures traveling from Reykjavik in March, with highs in Kilkenny at 50°F and lows at 40°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 17th (Tue) to allow enough time to drive to Dublin.

Things to do in Kilkenny

Historic Sites · Breweries & Distilleries · Parks · Nightlife
Find places to stay Mar 15 — 17:

2
nights
Dublin, Ireland

Fair City

A history spanning over a thousand years, vibrant nightlife, and a mix of Georgian and modern architecture make Dublin a popular European tourist destination.
Start off your visit on the 18th (Wed): make a trip to Grafton Street, wander the streets of Temple Bar, and then see the interesting displays at Kilmainham Gaol Museum. On the 19th (Thu), you'll have a packed day of sightseeing: see the interesting displays at Guinness Storehouse, stop by Cherish Me - Luxury Mother & Child, and then trek along Cliff Walk Car Park Bray.

For maps, traveler tips, reviews, and other tourist information, use the Dublin trip app.

Traveling by car from Kilkenny to Dublin takes 2 hours. Alternatively, you can take a bus; or take a train. Expect slightly colder evenings in Dublin when traveling from Kilkenny in March, with lows around 35°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 20th (Fri) so you can travel to Edinburgh.

Things to do in Dublin

Museums · Historic Sites · Outdoors · Parks

Side Trip

Find places to stay Mar 17 — 20:

2
nights
Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Athens of the North

World Heritage-listed Edinburgh combines ancient and modern in a uniquely Scottish atmosphere.
Start off your visit on the 20th (Fri): pause for some serene contemplation at Rosslyn Chapel, explore the historical opulence of Edinburgh Castle, and then contemplate the long history of Grassmarket. Here are some ideas for day two: wander the streets of Edinburgh Old Town, explore the striking landscape at Arthur's Seat, then examine the collection at Royal Yacht Britannia, and finally don't miss a visit to The Royal Mile.

To find other places to visit, where to stay, reviews, and more tourist information, go to the Edinburgh travel itinerary planner.

Traveling by flight from Dublin to Edinburgh takes 4.5 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of ferry and car; or do a combination of ferry and train. In March, daytime highs in Edinburgh are 47°F, while nighttime lows are 34°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 22nd (Sun) to allow time to drive to Glasgow.

Things to do in Edinburgh

Historic Sites · Museums · Nature · Parks

Side Trip

Find places to stay Mar 20 — 22:

2
nights
Glasgow, United Kingdom

Scotland's Style Capital

Scotland’s largest city, Glasgow is known for its cultural heritage and the friendliness of its people.
On the 22nd (Sun), sample the fine beverages at Glengoyne Distillery, stroll around Glasgow West End, then look for gifts at Time and Tide, and finally stop by Merchant City. Keep things going the next day: admire the striking features of House for an Art Lover, get engrossed in the history at The Tenement House, then take in the exciting artwork at The Glasgow School of Art, and finally explore the world behind art at Sharmanka Kinetic Theatre.

To find photos, where to stay, more things to do, and more tourist information, use the Glasgow road trip site.

You can drive from Edinburgh to Glasgow in 1.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train; or take a bus. In March in Glasgow, expect temperatures between 47°F during the day and 35°F at night. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 24th (Tue) so you can travel back home.

Things to do in Glasgow

Shopping · Museums · Neighborhoods · Historic Sites
Find places to stay Mar 22 — 24:

Iceland travel guide

4.5
Waterfalls · Churches · Thermal Spas
Land of Fire and Ice
Experience the drama of this mountainous island in the North Atlantic, from glacial rivers to rushing waterfalls and geothermal hot spots. Iceland's cities, like its capital Reykjavik, are home to passionate natives who honor their Icelandic culture and history. Venture from the cities to experience the country's most powerful attraction: its breathtaking landscapes. Take a trip to one of the island's renowned national parks, see the effects of volcanic activity, and go for a dip in one of its many lakes. A haven for outdoor recreation, you can glacier hike, whitewater raft, and swim in natural pools.

Ireland travel guide

4.4
Specialty Museums · Nightlife · Castles
Emerald Isle
Gentle green hills, Guinness, leprechauns, and friendly folks characterize this small isle of a country. From the busy big city of Dublin to cozy countryside, the emerald isle harbors a varied natural landscape and is steeped in tradition. Visitors can immerse themselves in the native Irish language by visiting a Gaeltacht, or Irish-speaking region of the country, where traditional culture thrives. The Irish are known for being open and welcoming: from the moment you land to the moment you leave, you'll be greeted with "cead mile failte"--a hundred thousand welcomes.

Scotland travel guide

4.4
Castles · Specialty Museums · Distilleries
A land packed with thousands of years of history, Scotland is home to numerous thriving cities and a vibrant population proud of its distinct culture, heritage, and art. The Scottish people are fond of saying "Good things come in small packages," and nowhere is that more true than in their compact homeland. Despite its relatively small size, the country is crammed full of attractions, not the least of which are numerous world-famous golf courses and whiskey distilleries. Though the sun may not always shine here, Scotland is a stunning country renowned for its dramatic scenery of mountains, valleys, hills, green fields, and rugged coastlines, guaranteeing a diverse holiday. While most tourists restrict their itinerary to the historic Highlands, where they search for the mysterious Loch Ness monster, you can also explore the Lowlands’ outstanding natural wonders and flourishing cultural scene.